John Sloan

Fine Art Prints

Chinese Restaurant by John Sloan - 1909

From £20.00 GBP

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Chinese Restaurant by John Sloan - 1909

Print Description

Chinese Restaurant by John French Sloan - 1909

£75.00 GBP

New York

The Lafayette by John Sloan - 1927

From £20.00 GBP

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The Lafayette by John Sloan - 1927

Print Description

The Lafayette by John Sloan - 1927

£75.00 GBP

John Sloan

Dust Storm, Fifth Avenue by John Sloan - 1906

From £20.00 GBP

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Dust Storm, Fifth Avenue by John Sloan - 1906

Print Description

Dust Storm, Fifth Avenue by John Sloan - 1906

£75.00 GBP

Prints - High Quality Art

Six O’Clock, Winter by John Sloan - 1912

From £25.00 GBP

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Six O’Clock, Winter by John Sloan - 1912

Print Description

Six O’Clock, Winter by John Sloan - 1912

£35.00 GBP

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Sunday Women, Drying Their Hair by John Sloan - 1912

Print Description

Sunday Women, Drying Their Hair by John Sloan - 1912

£35.00 GBP

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Travelling Carnival in Santa Fe by John Sloan - 1934

Print Description

Travelling Carnival in Santa Fe by John Sloan - 1934

£35.00 GBP

John Sloan

Sunbathers on the Roof by John Sloan - 1941

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Sunbathers on the Roof by John Sloan - 1941

Print Description

Sunbathers on the Roof by John Sloan - 1941.

£35.00 GBP

John Sloan

Yeats at Petitpas by John Sloan - 1910-1914

From £25.00 GBP

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Yeats at Petitpas by John Sloan - 1910-1914

Print Description

Yeats at Petitpas by John Sloan - 1910-1914.

This scene depicts a lively gathering of poets and artists at Petitpas', a French restaurant and boardinghouse in the Chelsea district of Manhattan. Shown from left to right around the table are literary critic Van Wyck Brooks; painter John Butler Yeats; poet Alan Seeger; the artist's wife, Dolly Sloan; Celestine Petipas (standing); fiction writer Robert Sneddon; miniature painter Eulabee Dix; John Sloan, the artist (corner); Fred King, the editor of Literary Digest; and, in the foreground, Vera Jelihovsky Johnston, wife of the Irish scholar Charles Johnston.

Associated with the Ashcan school—a group of urban realists who espoused the notion of "art for life's sake" instead of "art for art's sake"—John Sloan was well known for his scenes of everyday life. This lively representation of assembled artists and friends comes out of that context, as gatherings such as this were common at the time. John Butler Yeats, Irish painter and father of poet William Butler Yeats, lived at Petitpas' from 1909 until his death in 1922 and presided nightly at a table in the courtyard. By 1910, when Sloan began this painting, Yeats had become a significant mentor to the artist, especially in his detailed and methodical approach to portraiture. It is notable that Sloan chose to depict Yeats drawing a portrait rather than engaging in the lively conversation for which he was so well known. Sloan's rendering of his own likeness is also noteworthy as one of the most carefully executed and complete within the painting. These choices by Sloan invite a reading of this work as a tribute to the elder Yeats and his significant influence on the artist. The painting also functions as a commemoration of the year 1910 in general, a time of several professional accomplishments for Sloan, some of which were celebrated at this famed restaurant. - National Gallery of Art

£35.00 GBP

John Sloan

Going Barefoot by John Sloan - 1915

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Going Barefoot by John Sloan - 1915

Print Description

Going Barefoot by John Sloan - 1915

£35.00 GBP

John Sloan

Pigeons by John Sloan - 1910

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Pigeons by John Sloan - 1910

Print Description

Pigeons by John Sloan - 1910

£35.00 GBP

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Turning Out the Light, from New York City Life by John Sloan - 1905

Print Description

Turning Out the Light, from New York City Life by John Sloan - 1905.

In his late teens, John Sloan worked for a Philadelphia print dealer and bookseller and taught himself to etch by reading a handbook that described the technique. Between 1891 and 1904, he made approximately one hundred etchings for a publisher of calendars, illustrated books, and novelty items. After taking classes with Ash Can School painter Robert Henri, a proponent of realistic depictions of everyday life, Sloan applied these lessons to his printmaking when he embarked on the series New York City Life in 1905–06. Despite critical acclaim for the ten etchings in this series, the public found them too risqué, and Sloan initially exhibited and sold few of them. One of these prints, Turning Out the Light, is an example of the sort of innuendo that some viewers found objectionable. However, in choosing ordinary people for his subjects, Sloan was following the example of artists he admired, including Goya, Dürer, Rembrandt, and Hogarth, as well as contemporary illustrators. In fact, a humanitarian outlook informed much of his art, and part of the appeal of printmaking for him was that it made art more affordable and accessible. As art editor for the Socialist magazine The New Masses from 1910 to 1914, he also published many political and satirical drawings. - MOMA

£50.00 GBP

Print Name

Sixth Avenue and Thirtieth Street, New York City by John Sloan -1907

Print Description

Sixth Avenue and Thirtieth Street, New York City by John Sloan -1907

£55.00 GBP

John Sloan

McSorley's Bar by John Sloan - 1912

From £30.00 GBP

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McSorley's Bar by John Sloan - 1912

Print Description

McSorley's Bar by John Sloan - 1912

£30.00 GBP

John Sloan

Sun and Wind on the Roof by John Sloan - 1915

From £20.00 GBP

Print Name

Sun and Wind on the Roof by John Sloan - 1915

Print Description

Sun and Wind on the Roof by John Sloan - 1915

£30.00 GBP

John Sloan

Isadora Duncan by John Sloan - 1911

From £20.00 GBP

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Isadora Duncan by John Sloan - 1911

Print Description

Isadora Duncan by John Sloan - 1911

£30.00 GBP

John Sloan

Red Kimono on the Roof by John Sloan - 1912

From £20.00 GBP

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Red Kimono on the Roof by John Sloan - 1912

Print Description

Red Kimono on the Roof by John Sloan - 1912

£30.00 GBP

John Sloan

Artist John Sloan was born in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania in the late summer of 1871, the son of an amateur artist and occasional business man. Five years later Sloan and his family moved to Philadelphia, and in 1884 he started at the prestigious Central High School. A few years later he was forced to leave early to help support his family and in 1888 he began working for a bookseller and print dealer. Soon teaching himself how to etch with the aid of Philip Gilbert Hamilton's The Etcher's Handbook. At the age of twenty Sloan began drawing classes at the Spring Garden Institute and started as a freelance commercial artist.

Not long after he was given a staff job in the art department of the Philadelphia Inquirer all the while studying drawing at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1895 he started working for the Philadelphia Press.

Around the turn of the century, under the influence of the artist Robert Henri, Sloan started painting more seriously producing portraits and landscapes from his Philadelphia neighborhood. Around this time Sloan with others started what would later be called the Ash Can School - an artistic movement that became best known for portraying scenes from the poorer districts of New York City.These artists thought it was almost their duty to tell truths about ht city and the often harsh conditions of modern life that was often ignored by the 'suffocating influence of the Genteel Tradition in the visual arts.

The origins of the name "Ash Can school" came from a complaint found in a magazine called The Masses alleging that there were too many "pictures of ashcans and girls hitching up their skirts on Horatio Street." The Ashcan School of artists have also been known as "The Apostles of Ugliness" and consisted, other than John Sloan, Robert Henri (1865–1929), George Luks (1867–1933), William Glackens (1870–1938), John Sloan(1871–1951), and Everett Shinn (1876–1953). Some of them met studying together under the renowned realist Thomas Anshutz at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts others met in the two main newspaper offices of Philadelphia where they worked as illustrators.